Wednesday, January 31, 2007

The Market NYC

If you can get to the city go check out The Market NYC, it is a young designers market,located at 268 Mulberry street, in NOHO, every Sat. & Sun. They are still working on a website. Also check out www.meetup.com, look for the fashion group set up by gary, in New york, for indie fashion designers. He is trying to put together a group that may someday all be able to meet. Fashion week starts tomorrow, Feb. 2, 2007 in Bryant Park, very cool. I loved some of the stuff that was shown in Paris. Hopefully NY will be just as inspiring. Met a very cool textile/fashion designer at her store in SOHO, Mary Jaeger. She has very cool dyeing techniques and fabric manipulation. www.maryjaeger.com.

Friday, January 26, 2007

I love NY

Yeah! I am off to NYC this weekend to hit a few museums, my favorite fabric stores and to check out this market actually called, The Market NYC, young designers market. It happens every Sat. and Sun. www.themarketnyc.com. Always fun to see what other indie designers are up to. I want to go to Momo Falana, they dye garments like no other! They take my 2 favorite things and combine them. They have a lot of bias cut dresses they hand dye. Bias is my favorite. So sexy and feminine. To me it is the equivalent to wearing liquid fabric. Even though I love to dye things, I can't imagine how they do what they do. I wouldn't want to know either. I love that they do it and I get to appreciate it. They are at www.momofalana.com check them out.
On another note, I just started working with a screen printer. She is a lot of fun. I am designing all the peices, she is doing the screen printing. Promise when they are done, I will have figured out how to use my digital camera so I can upload a picture or two. You can check out her things at www.whosiepie.com.

Sunday, January 14, 2007

Balenciaga, more is more

This is the funniest thing to me. Balenciaga closed his fashion house in 1968 because he was disillusioned by the advent of pret-a-porter that the French were introducing at the time. Somewhere along the way , (I actually think I was in College when they re-opened the house in the mid to late 1980's) his house was re-opened. Why? If he didn't like or believe in ready to wear then, why would the the house believe in it now? I might be the only one out there that feels the way I do but, I think a house should close with the passing of the designer it was created for. How could any one possibly know what a particular designer will design at any given time. I think for an industry that is supposed to be so fresh and new, it is choking itself with the restraint of living too much in the past.

Check out
MFIT ON THE ROAD Balenciaga Paris

"July 5, 2006 - January 27, 2007 Following its program of monographs organized around the great fashion masters of the 20th century, the Museum of Decorative Arts pays homage, for the first time in Paris, to Cristobal Balenciaga, the famous couturier whose career shaped the history of fashion.160 pieces trace in chronological and thematic order the work of Balenciaga, punctuated by the view of Nicholas Ghesquière, artistic director of the design house, in an exhibition designed by Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster and Benoît Lalloz. Musée de la Mode et du Textile107, rue de Rivoli 75001 Paris France http://www.lesartsdecoratifs.fr/ tél. : 01 44 55 57 50."

Wednesday, January 10, 2007

Blast From The Past

I stuck my hand into my pile of magazines and pulled out British Vogue December 1989. On the cover, Liza Minelli wearing a silver metallic leather coat with fringe all over it and of course massive shoulder pads, a black leather belt with a huge silver U shaped belt buckle, stockings, black thigh high boots, and a black boustier with lots of lace. This cover is so perfectly the last cover for the eighties. The end of the era of excess in fashion. Big everything is hopefully gone forever. Big something might have it's place, not big everything.
Inside there is an article celebrating the design career of Giorgio di Sant'Angelo http://nymag.com/shopping/articles/02/springfashion/santangelo.htm. He passed away at 53 years young. I was lucky to have worked with him during my senior fashion show project at FIT. He was the design critic for our couture class. There is a quote here in the magazine from him, "I'm not a fashion designer, I'm an artist who happens to work in fashion, an engineer of color and form" I think I forgot how much his philosophy influensed me. He goes on to say, " Stretch, for me, is key. It is both contemporary and practical." I do remember him insisting to all of us in this eveningwear/couture class that everything must be able to be rolled up and put into a suitcase, pulled out and able to be worn without a lot of fuss. The funny part was, we had a proffessor who had the exact opposite philosophy about eveningwear. He always told us (and made us practice), an evening gown should have enough stays and foundations built into it, that it will stand in the corner of the room all by itself without a body in it. I wonder where Prof. Contrary is now?
Another tribute in the magazine is for Diana Vreeland. http://www.canadianinteriordesign.com/kwi/diana_vreeland.htm What an amazing person with an influence on the fashion industry that I'm not sure we will see again, not in our life time anyway. She was fashion editor at Harpers Bazaar, when she was woed over to Vogue to be editor-in-chief during the sixties. I think she is most known for how she saw the world and she taught other people how to see the world differently. She says here " I have the kind of eyes that will travel over a magazine page, find a tiny insignificant-looking detail no bigger than your fingernail, and get totally mesmerised. My immediate instinct is to want to blow it up - make it big! I think laying out a beautiful picture in a beautiful way is a bore. You have to blow it right across the page and down the side, crop it, cut it in half, combime it with something else... you see I'm looking for the most far fetched perfection." I think the fashion industry as a whole is missing the influence and presence, that only Diana Vreeland could have.
TTFN

Monday, January 08, 2007

Rainy Day Fun!

I could not have been more wrong about it finally getting cold in New England! It was 71 degrees in the sun at my house on Saturday! This is insane, and I am a winter baby. I love winter and snow. I am actually one of those sick people that actually likes to shovel! Sorry, not for anyone else but me. I am in my studio watching it pour, getting ready to throw out the entire contents of this place so I can start designing my spring collection. No, that isn't the fun part, (actually it will be) the fun part is I am having lunch with a fellow indie designer and friend to talk about collaborating together on some peices for spring. I love the possibilities that are created when people smash their ideas together. She is a screen printer, she has a children's line and a women's line that she will be expanding this year. Her website for children is www.whosiepie.com. You can check out her style there and soon she will have a store online as well as myself. I hope you are doing something productive today!

Sunday, January 07, 2007

FIT, not a New Year's resolution

Well, maybe it should be a resolution to try to get to the museum at the Fashion Institute of technology, FIT has a great exhibit right now called She's Like a Rainbow: Colors in Fashion, it runs November 11, 2006 - May 5, 2007 . It is part of the permanent exhibit Fashion and Textile History Gallery. http://www.fitnyc.edu/aspx/Content.aspx?menu=PastGlobal:Museum
Here is the description from part of the press release.
In November 2005, The Museum at FIT launched America's first and only permanent gallery of Fashion and Textile History. The gallery features changing selections from the Museum's permanent collections, which are comprised of more than 50,000 garments and accessories dating from the 18th century to the present - with particular strength in contemporary designer fashion - some 30,000 textiles from the 6th to 21st centuries, as well as 300,000 textile swatches and 1,300 sample books. The Fashion and Textile History Gallery is organized chronologically, so that students and visitors can understand the important cultural, social, and technological changes that fashion so clearly demonstrates. In this and other respects, the gallery supplements the many classes and tours held in the Museum as well as its special exhibitions and public programs. The Museum at FIT is one of the world's only institutions dedicated to the study of fashion and textiles and now features its collections year-round.
Sign up to be on their email list if you go to the site. They will keep you posted on future happenings. There are few really great schools for design, and this is one of them. I will never forget my 4 years there. I love to go back to use the library and see the exhibits. Hope you get there soon.